Reducing Information Pollution

Intel’s War on Information Overload

Source: Basex
Author: Jonathan Spira, Cody Burke
Date: 2008

Intel’s War On Information Overload

This 36-page report, “Intel’s War on Information Overload: A Case Study”, is an exclusive in-depth analysis of the efforts that Intel has undertaken over the years to combat Information Overload.

Information Overload, which describes an excess of information that results in an inability to concentrate on tasks and stay focused, is a massive problem in the twenty-first century; recent Basex research shows that Information Overload costs the U.S. economy ca. $900 billion per year.

Intel has long been a leader in the silicon revolution and in the adoption of knowledge sharing and collaboration technologies. Intel also has a history of developing programs and practices to deal with Information Overload issues for well over a decade, and for good reason.

Intel’s own research indicated that each knowledge worker loses ca. eight hours per week due to Information Overload, which for a company its size would result in a cost of $1 billion per year.

Internal Intel surveys in 2006 revealed that that:
– The typical Intel employee was receiving 50-100 e-mail messages daily
– Employees were on average spending 20 hours per week handling e-mail
– 30% of e-mails were unnecessary
– Top executives reported receiving up to 300 messages per day
– Intel as a company received on average 3 million e-mails a day

In response to these numbers, Intel launched a series of seven-month-long pilot initiatives aimed at combating Information Overload. The three pilot programs were:
– Quiet Time
– No E-mail Day (NED)
– E-mail Service Level Agreement (SLA)

For this report, a Basex exclusive, Basex was provided with direct access to Intel personnel and exclusive access to surveys conducted before, during, and after each program.

In this groundbreaking report, Basex examines such critical issues as:
– What does Information Overload really cost?
– Can you change people’s expectations about email reply times?
– Are mandated no e-mail days a good idea?
– How do you give knowledge workers more time for thought and reflection?
– What effect does one’s role have on the effectiveness of Information Overload reduction programs?

The report explores the sources of information and interruptions that the knowledge worker encounters on a daily basis, and provides an in-depth analysis of the efforts that Intel has undertaken to confront the resulting Information Overload and lost productivity.

“Intel’s War on Information Overload: A Case Study” is a must-read for any organization seeking to launch programs and initiatives to combat Information Overload, and a rare glimpse into how Intel, an early leader in such efforts, is confronting the issue.

As a member of IORG, you are entitled to a single-user license for this report. 

To download the report, click here: IntelWarIO.BasexReport

Source:
Excerpt: Source: Basex Author: Jonathan Spira, Cody Burke Date: 2008 Intel’s War On Information Overload This 36-page report, “Intel’s War on Information Overload: A Case Study”, is an exclusive in-depth analysis of the efforts that Intel has undertaken over the years to combat Information Overload. Information Overload, which describes an excess of information that results in [...]

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