IORG

IORG Information Overload Group Podcast Logo

Nathan Zeldes – President of IORG – Interview

Nathan Zeldes – President of IORG – Interview
IORGCast

 
 
00:00 / 1:33:54
 
1X
 

Conversation with Nathan Zeldes, IORG President, entrepreneur and one of the first activists to work to reduce Information Overload.

With Nathan we talk about his past when he firstly noticed there was a problem with Information Overload and some of the solutions and experiments he applied to this problem.  We also talk about trust, leadership, being an employee in today’s enterprise with it’s rich variety of information-focused tools.

Learn More

Information Overload Research Group

Resource Date:  1/1/2007
URL:   Link to Source Article or Site

We work together to understand, publicize and solve the information overload problem. We do this by (1) defining and building awareness of information overload, (2) facilitating and funding collaboration and advanced research aimed at shaping solutions and establishing best practices, and (3) serving as a resource center where we share information and resources, offer guidance and connections, and help make the business case for fighting information overload.

Learn More

Tackling Information Overload

Resource Author:  Paula Hane
Resource Date:  5/4/2009
Resource Name:  Information Today
URL:   Link to Source Article or Site

The subject line grabbed my attention-“Information Overload: The Impact on the Organization.”

The thought of spending time listening to the webcast was itself pressure. But I was feeling particularly overloaded that day, so I registered for the free event from the nonprofit group calling itself the Information Overload Research Group (IORG; https://iorgforum.org). A key company in the organization is Basex, Inc. (www.basex.com), which describes itself as a “knowledge economy research firm” that serves IT vendors and buyers with an expertise in knowledge worker management and productivity. Here’s the compelling statistic: Basex estimates, based on data it has gathered, that information overload costs the U.S. economy a minimum of $900 billion a year in lost productivity and reduced innovation. That’s a big number.

Learn More