Reducing Information Pollution

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Jonathan Spira

Curators in Chief

February 17, 2014 | Posted By

Is Information Overload a $650 Billion Drag on the Economy?

April 5, 2010 | Posted By

Source: New York Times
Author: Steve Lohr
Date: December 20, 2007

Basex, a business research firm, came out this week with a twist on the
usual year-end looking-back and looking-forward lists. The firm picked a
“problem of the year” for 2008, information overload.

Link

Intel’s War on Information Overload

January 12, 2010 | Posted By

Source: Basex
Author: Jonathan Spira, Cody Burke
Date: 2008

Intel’s War On Information Overload

This 36-page report, “Intel’s War on Information Overload: A Case Study”, is an exclusive in-depth analysis of the efforts that Intel has undertaken over the years to combat Information Overload.

Information Overload, which describes an excess of information that results in an inability to concentrate on tasks and stay focused, is a massive problem in the twenty-first century; recent Basex research shows that Information Overload costs the U.S. economy ca. $900 billion per year.

Intel has long been a leader in the silicon revolution and in the adoption of knowledge sharing and collaboration technologies. Intel also has a history of developing programs and practices to deal with Information Overload issues for well over a decade, and for good reason.

Intel’s own research indicated that each knowledge worker loses ca. eight hours per week due to Information Overload, which for a company its size would result in a cost of $1 billion per year.

Internal Intel surveys in 2006 revealed that that:
– The typical Intel employee was receiving 50-100 e-mail messages daily
– Employees were on average spending 20 hours per week handling e-mail
– 30% of e-mails were unnecessary
– Top executives reported receiving up to 300 messages per day
– Intel as a company received on average 3 million e-mails a day

In response to these numbers, Intel launched a series of seven-month-long pilot initiatives aimed at combating Information Overload. The three pilot programs were:
– Quiet Time
– No E-mail Day (NED)
– E-mail Service Level Agreement (SLA)

For this report, a Basex exclusive, Basex was provided with direct access to Intel personnel and exclusive access to surveys conducted before, during, and after each program.

In this groundbreaking report, Basex examines such critical issues as:
– What does Information Overload really cost?
– Can you change people’s expectations about email reply times?
– Are mandated no e-mail days a good idea?
– How do you give knowledge workers more time for thought and reflection?
– What effect does one’s role have on the effectiveness of Information Overload reduction programs?

The report explores the sources of information and interruptions that the knowledge worker encounters on a daily basis, and provides an in-depth analysis of the efforts that Intel has undertaken to confront the resulting Information Overload and lost productivity.

“Intel’s War on Information Overload: A Case Study” is a must-read for any organization seeking to launch programs and initiatives to combat Information Overload, and a rare glimpse into how Intel, an early leader in such efforts, is confronting the issue.

As a member of IORG, you are entitled to a single-user license for this report. 

To download the report, click here: IntelWarIO.BasexReport

Multitasking ist ein Mythos

January 3, 2010 | Posted By

Source: Vienna Online

Published: August 8, 2009

Nicht das Internet- Surfen schmälere die Produktivität, sondern der Überfluss an E- Mails. Diese Meinung vertritt Jonathan B. Spira, Geschäftsführer der New Yorker Beratungsfirma Basex, in einem Interview mit dem ORF.

Link

Drowning in Information? You're Not Alone

January 3, 2010 | Posted By

Source: Huffington Post
Date: August 11, 2009
“Celebrate” Information Overload Awareness Day: August 12

The Information Age has brought with it many advances which have become part of everyday life, including the Web and mobile phones, not to mention e-mail, text and instant messaging, and social networks. While there are many benefits to having these tools and modes of communication, they also bring with them a costly side effect: the problem of information overload.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jonathan-b-spira/drowning-in-information-y_b_256801.html

Is Information Overload a $650 Billion Drag on the Economy?

January 3, 2010 | Posted By

Source: New York Times

Published: December 20, 2007

Author: Steve Lohr

Basex, a business research firm, came out this week with a twist on the usual year-end looking-back and looking-forward lists. The firm picked a “problem of the year” for 2008, information overload.

Managing the Knowledge Workforce: Understanding the Information Revolution That´s Changing the Business World

January 3, 2010 | Posted By

Source: Mercury Business Press

Published: 2005

Comprehensive book that covers the significant changes the business world is facing. The knowledge workforce today is the lynchpin to an organization’s success, as the world morphs into a knowledge economy. This change represents a significant challenge to managers, who are accustomed to managing workers in more traditional roles. Knowledge work represents a very different economic model. The minimum cost of tools and technologies that supports these workers, estimated to be between $5,000 and $10,000 per employee per year, is growing steadily, yet most companies have failed to recognize the changes they need to make in how they conduct business and manage their workforce. Instead, companies need to look for ways in which they can view and manage their human resources as a pool of intellectual capital – raw material for the knowledge economy. Knowledge workers spend 15 percent of their time each day searching, and 50 percent of these searches fail – at an annual cost of $6,000 per worker. In addition, companies have yet to recognize the high cost of ‘lag time,’ the unproductive time that represents 90 percent of overall knowledge processes which exists because companies continue to provide their knowledge workers with outmoded tools. In aggregate, lag time cost the corporate world ca. $25 billion in 2004 and will increase by 15 percent in 2005.


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