Email Overload

Email Overload and Email Processing

That pesky RTA button…

One of our members sent a pointer to this article on TechCrunch. Apparently, the Nielsen Media Research’s management had taken action to remove the Reply to All button from the interface of all its 35,000 employees’ email clients, as part of a drive to eliminate bureaucracy and inefficiency.

It is fascinating to read the comments to the post. As my own experience confirms, suggestions like this tend to stir heated emotions. And indeed, on one hand, it is easy to identify with the views that it would be better to educate people to act sensibly; on the other, with thousands of users, we know that will never suffice. My own take on this is that the more aggravating RTAs – the ones that are a clear result of thoughtlessness – may be solved even if you don’t remove the button, but simply  move it on the toolbar away from REPLY. Even such a tiny change might eliminate some of the reflexive use of RTA when REPLY would suffice.

What do you think?

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Email and the Polycom…

We all know those meetings where everyone is “doing email”; we know that this affects the attendees’ hearing – nobody listens. But there are cases where it also affects their speech, as transmitted to other attendees in a different location.

To see how, check this post on Commonsense Design, my other blog.

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EOM now recognized by Gmail!

I can’t remember where I heard the EOM technique originally, though I was certainly teaching it widely at Intel as early as 1999, and it was published externally in 2001 as an “Intel Email commandment”. The idea is simple:

When possible, send a message that is only a subject line, so recipients don’t have to open the email to read a single line. End the subject line with < EOM> , the acronym for End of Message.”

I was pleased to read on the Gmail blog (via Lifehacker) that Google have added this as a feature to Google Mail; or rather, they made Gmail recognize it: if you add (EOM) to the end of your subject line, Gmail will skip the usual prompt asking you if you want to send the message without any text in the body.

Cool!

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