cellphones

A 10-Digit Key Code to Your Private Life: Your Cellphone Number

Resource Author:  Steve Lohr
Resource Date:  11/12/2016
Resource Name:  New York Times
URL:   Link to Source Article or Site

The next time someone asks you for your cellphone number, you may want to think twice about giving it.

The cellphone number is more than just a bunch of digits. It is increasingly used as a link to private information maintained by all sorts of companies, including money lenders and social networks. It can be used to monitor and predict what you buy, look for online or even watch on television.

Learn More

Married to Their Smartphones (Oh, and to Each Other, Too)

Resource Author:  Brooke Lea Foster
Resource Date:  10/28/2016
Resource Name:  New York Times
URL:   Link to Source Article or Site

Sherry Zheng was cleaning up from dinner, ready to toss out the remaining fried rice, when she grabbed her phone from the counter to text her husband, Chris. He was upstairs bathing their three children. “Should I save you the leftovers?”

Her phone vibrated: “Sure.”

Learn More

Kill Voice Mail: Banish Those Annoying Messages From Your Smartphone

Resource Author:  Joanna Stern
Resource Date:  10/28/2016
Resource Name:  Wall Street Journal
URL:   Link to Source Article or Site

In 1986, the answering machine was a miracle. In 2016, it’s a joke.

Learn More

TECH TRENDS: I’M ADDICTED TO MY CELL PHONE!

Resource Date:  11/27/2016
Resource Name:  The Mountain-Ear
URL:   Link to Source Article or Site

Gail Eddy, Nederland. Does anyone else wonder if they spend too much time on their phone? Too much time using Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other social media sites? I know for me there have been times when I have picked up my phone to (gasp!) make a phone call. After I enter my passcode, it opens to the last screen I had active. If it is Facebook, I’ll check my notifications, completely forgetting about that call. Does that ever happen to you?

Learn More

Phone Makers Could Cut Off Drivers. So Why Don’t They?

Resource Author:  Matt Richel
Resource Date:  09/24/2016
Resource Name:  The New York Times
URL:   Link to Source Article or Site

The court filings paint a grisly picture: As Ashley Kubiak sped down a Texas highway in her Dodge Ram truck, she checked her iPhone for messages. Distracted, she crashed into a sport utility vehicle, killing its driver and a passenger and leaving a child paralyzed.

With driving fatalities rising at levels not seen in 50 years, the growing incidence of distracted driving is getting part of the blame. Now a lawsuit related to that 2013 Texas crash is raising a question: Does Apple — or any cellphone maker or wireless company — have a responsibility to prevent devices from being used by drivers in illegal and dangerous ways?

Learn More

A Distracted-Driving Ban in New Jersey? Some Say It Threatens a Way of Life

Resource Author:  Vivian Yee
Resource Date:  08/17/2016
Resource Name:  New York Times
URL:   Link to Source Article or Site

MORRISTOWN, N.J. — Texting, we have all come to admit, is the enemy of road safety everywhere. Applying makeup behind the wheel: more or less universally frowned upon. Few would condone driving while reading a book, rooting around in the back seat or eating anything that involves utensils.

In New Jersey, where suburban sprawl has elevated cars from mere possessions to four-wheeled appendages, and driving from an activity to a near-perpetual state of being, things are slightly more complicated.

Learn More

A bar owner in the UK has built a Faraday cage to stop customers using their phones

Resource Author:  Fiona MacDonald
Resource Date:  08/04/2016
Resource Name:  Science Alert
URL:   Link to Source Article or Site

The owner of a cocktail bar in the UK has turned to physics in an attempt to force his customers to actually talk to other instead of just staring at social media all night.

Steve Tyler, who owns the Gin Tub in East Sussex, has built his very own Faraday cage around the establishment to block mobile phone signals from entering the building.

Learn More

Snapchat at 107 M.P.H.? Lawsuit Blames Teenager (and Snapchat)

Resource Author:  Katie Rogers
Resource Date:  05/03/2016
Resource Name:  New York Times
URL:   Link to Source Article or Site

Even in the age of social media, this particular selfie seemed extreme: a teenager strapped into a gurney, with blood running down her forehead, somehow taking the time to tap out a message to her Snapchat friends: “Lucky to be alive.”

The selfie quickly went viral and is a component of a lawsuit filed by a Georgia man accusing the teenager, Christal McGee, of recklessly using Snapchat while driving over 100 miles per hour and slamming into his vehicle last year, leaving him with severe injuries. He is also suing Snapchat, accusing the company of negligence.

Learn More

Texting and Driving? Watch Out for the Textalyzer

Resource Author:  Matt Richtel
Resource Date:  04/27/2016
Resource Name:  New York Times
URL:   Link to Source Article or Site

Over the last seven years, most states have banned texting by drivers, and public service campaigns have tried an array of tactics — “It can wait,” among them — to persuade people to put down their phones when they are behind the wheel.

Yet the problem, by just about any measure, appears to be getting worse. Americans confess in surveys that they are still texting while driving, as well as using Facebook and Snapchat and taking selfies. Road fatalities, which had fallen for years, are now rising sharply, up roughly 8 percent in 2015 over the previous year, according to preliminary estimates.

Learn More

This Is What iPhone Emojis Look Like On Android

Resource Author:  Nicole Nguyen
Resource Date:  04/12/2016
Resource Name:  BuzzFeed
URL:   Link to Source Article or Site

I thought I was texting, HAY LET’S GO OUT :and danse:…
…when it was really more like HAY LET’S GO OUT :can I court you: (on Android) or even more terrifyingly, HAY LET’S GO OUT :I’m a preteen: (on Samsung).
A new paper has shown that people interpret an emoji’s meaning in a variety of ways, in part because emojis look so different across platforms.

Learn More